Entrepreneur Eric Lefkofsky’s Quest To Help Solve Breast Cancer

Eric Lefkofsky, who also founded Groupon, founded Tempus, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois. He recently partnered with the University of Chicago by giving the doctors there access to his data in order to help breast cancer patients. The data that he has provided them is molecular sequencing and analysis which allows the doctors to create individualized treatment plans for each patient. Additionally, Tempus will use the data gathered from 1,000 breast cancer patients in order to find patterns that will help see how other patients will respond to treatment in the future.

One of the doctors at the University of Chicago, Dr. Olufunmilayo Olopade, said that even though breast cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer very little data has been collected from past breast cancer patients in order to treat it. Due to this doctors have to make treatment decisions that don’t make use of specific gene information. By having access to this specific gene information the doctor will be able to make a more informed decision when treating each patient. The platform that Tempus designed makes use of machine learning and genomic sequencing. This data helps doctors make real-time, individualized treatment decisions which will lead to better outcomes.

Tempus has partnered with several health organizations over the past year. Among these is the Mayo Clinic, Penn Medicine, the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, and the University of Michigan.

Eric Lefkofsky founded Tempus in 2015 and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of the company. In addition to Tempus and Groupon he has founded a number of other successful companies including Uptake, Lightbank, and Mediabank. Lefkofsky graduated from the University of Michigan in 1991 and earned his JD in 1994 from the University of Michigan Law School.

In 2006 Lefkofsky founded Lefkofsky Family Foundation along with his wife, Liz. The charitable causes that they contribute to include education, medical research, human rights, and the arts. Among his other charitable activities, he is a Trustee of Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and is the Chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Steppenwolf Theatre Company.

 

Seattle Genetics Eyes Major Expansion In the Near-Term

Seattle Genetics is busting at the seams as it announced the largest round of financing for its investors. According to the CEO, Clay Siegall, the company will offer $552 Million in public stock offering compared to $480 Million, announced earlier. The latest announcement came after massive interest by investors who are eagerly awaiting future developments within the company.

Clay Siegall explained that proceeds from the public offering will not only be used to expand its current product-line, but also to invest in people and infrastructure. Regarding manpower, Clay insisted that he has plans to hire 100 employees per year for the next five years. If everything goes according to the plan, the biotech company will have 1300 highly skilled employees by 2020. To accommodate these employees, the company is already looking for additional space close to its headquarters. Analysts believe that Seattle Genetics has already finalized plans to lease space at Canyon Park area of Bothell.

It is notable that Seattle Genetics is one of the oldest bio-tech companies in the area, operating since 1998. As yet, the company is not profitable as it posted a loss of nearly $47 Million in the second quarter of 2016. However, experts believe that investors don’t need to worry as the revenues continue to increase amid the success of the company’s products in the market. In fact, it is common for bio-tech companies to take a long time to turn revenues into profits.

Clay Siegall also confirmed that their strategy focuses on the long-run profitability. His company is particularly well-known for the Cancer drug Adcetris, which is becoming very popular in treating major cancer-related symptoms. As such, Clay Siegall played an instrumental role in the development of the drug.

Clay is a well-known bio-tech expert who worked at Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute from 1991 to 1997. Earlier, Clay also gained experience at the National Cancer Institute. Besides holding the title of CEO at Seattle Genetics, Clay serves at the board of various prominent medical and bio-tech companies, which includes Alder BioPharmaceuticals and Mirna Therapeutics, among others. Clay Siegall earned his PHD from George Washington University.