Thor Halvorssen Seen as New Face for Global Human Rights Movement

The New York Times once called him “proudly politically incorrect,” and that nicely sums up who Thor Halvorssen truly is.

The founder of the New York City-based Human Rights Foundation (HRF) continues talking loudly for those people around the world, whose voices have been silenced by dictators and other tyrants destroying their nations and the basic human rights of their people for further greed and political gain.

Mr. Halvorssen has seen it all and experienced some difficult moments as he tells the weeklystandard.com.

He logs many friendly flier miles, sneaking into places he really shouldn’t, like the time he and his cameraman jetted off to Ho Chi Minh in 2010 to interview ThichQuang Do, the father of the banned Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam, who had suffered under house arrest for 28 years.

Mr. Halvorssen had quietly made his way into the monastery and procured a fascinating interview with the patriarch. Upon his exit, Vietnamese authorities were watching and nabbed Mr. Halvorssen detaining him for quite some time, until he could convince the Vietnamese police that he was in fact, merely a Buddhist seeker. Hr. Halvorssen claims he was beaten badly during the detainment, while his cameraman had luckily escaped out a side door with the video card hidden on his person.

Mr. Halvorssen has traveled the globe trying to help dissidents and political prisoners as he shines a glaring light on those nations who force their people to live under ugly despotism.

He goes after the “big boys,” like North Korea’s Kim Jong-un, whose citizens live in constant fear for being taken to one of the country’s unspeakably horrific prison camps, for the most minor of offenses. It is believed that some 200,000 remain imprisoned there, in an East Asian country ironically called, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea .

Thor Halvorssen has had his life threatened many times, and others have tried to label him this or that. In his mind, he is not a conservative but more of a “classical liberal” in the John Stuart Mill philosophy.

To learn more, visit HRF.